Skype names for cam fun

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The company took names and provided content and links for owners, getting a cut of the advertising revenue.

At one point, represented 150 owners with about 150,000 domain names, generating 50 million unique visitors a month.

Bob Parsons, CEO and founder of domain registration company Go Daddy.com, says this type of business is fairly straightforward."They make their money in two ways," Parsons said.

"One way is through the traffic they get and the other is the appreciation of the name."Parson didn't think there was anything wrong with the practice as long as those involved weren't using names trademarked by others."Domain names are becoming 21st century real estate," Parsons said.

These are boom times in an estimated billion industry that involves the buying and selling of domain names.

Fischer, 44, of Brooklyn, New York, and Goldberger, 46, of Cherry Hill, New Jersey, figured there was money to be made early.

They also troll lists of names with domain registrations set to expire, enabling them to get a jump on buying it. Five years ago, the duo could get a good name for ,000.

They don't bother with dot-nets or the others."Dot-com is king," Goldberger said. Now the minimum is more like 0,000 -- as the auction proved.

Skype names for cam fun-5

By Adam Goldman, Associated Press NEW YORK — Inside a midtown hotel, Larry Fischer is on his cellphone with a financial backer as his partner Ari Goldberger does quick research on a laptop computer. Some believe the industry's market value could reach billion by 2010 as people continue to purchase approximately 90,000 names a day and the number of domain registrars swells. It's a piece of real estate on the Web that can't be replaced.

"Kind of a square peg in a round whole and this lawsuit just kind of changed everything for me."He eventually left the respected Philadelphia law firm where he worked in 1997 and joined a small startup in Manhattan called mail.com, which was buying up domain names.

Goldberger began collaborating with Fischer in 2001, building their portfolio of domain names.

They are bidding furiously at this auction of Internet domain names, with hopes of snagging At the end of first quarter 2007, at least 128 million domain names had been registered worldwide, a 31% increase over the previous year, according to Veri Sign, which runs some of the core domain name directories for the Internet. It's your stake in the ground, your stake in the Internet." At the Manhattan auction, Fischer and Goldberger snatched up four names for more than

By Adam Goldman, Associated Press NEW YORK — Inside a midtown hotel, Larry Fischer is on his cellphone with a financial backer as his partner Ari Goldberger does quick research on a laptop computer. Some believe the industry's market value could reach $4 billion by 2010 as people continue to purchase approximately 90,000 names a day and the number of domain registrars swells. It's a piece of real estate on the Web that can't be replaced.

"Kind of a square peg in a round whole and this lawsuit just kind of changed everything for me."He eventually left the respected Philadelphia law firm where he worked in 1997 and joined a small startup in Manhattan called mail.com, which was buying up domain names.

Goldberger began collaborating with Fischer in 2001, building their portfolio of domain names.

They are bidding furiously at this auction of Internet domain names, with hopes of snagging At the end of first quarter 2007, at least 128 million domain names had been registered worldwide, a 31% increase over the previous year, according to Veri Sign, which runs some of the core domain name directories for the Internet. It's your stake in the ground, your stake in the Internet." At the Manhattan auction, Fischer and Goldberger snatched up four names for more than $1.2 million and a fifth for a client, representing only a handful of the names sold for a total of $12.4 million during both the live and silent auction. Goldberger's entry into the business was unorthodox to say the least. sued him, alleging trademark infringement after Goldberger registered esqwire.com, which resembles one of the company's magazines.

"It's not about words," said Monte Cahn, founder and CEO of Moniker.com, a company that specializes in domain asset management and held the Manhattan auction. The auctions were held during a domain conference in June that attracts some of the biggest players in this niche business. The two sides eventually settled and Goldberger, a lawyer, was allowed to keep the name.

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By Adam Goldman, Associated Press NEW YORK — Inside a midtown hotel, Larry Fischer is on his cellphone with a financial backer as his partner Ari Goldberger does quick research on a laptop computer. Some believe the industry's market value could reach $4 billion by 2010 as people continue to purchase approximately 90,000 names a day and the number of domain registrars swells. It's a piece of real estate on the Web that can't be replaced."Kind of a square peg in a round whole and this lawsuit just kind of changed everything for me."He eventually left the respected Philadelphia law firm where he worked in 1997 and joined a small startup in Manhattan called mail.com, which was buying up domain names.Goldberger began collaborating with Fischer in 2001, building their portfolio of domain names.They are bidding furiously at this auction of Internet domain names, with hopes of snagging At the end of first quarter 2007, at least 128 million domain names had been registered worldwide, a 31% increase over the previous year, according to Veri Sign, which runs some of the core domain name directories for the Internet. It's your stake in the ground, your stake in the Internet." At the Manhattan auction, Fischer and Goldberger snatched up four names for more than $1.2 million and a fifth for a client, representing only a handful of the names sold for a total of $12.4 million during both the live and silent auction. Goldberger's entry into the business was unorthodox to say the least. sued him, alleging trademark infringement after Goldberger registered esqwire.com, which resembles one of the company's magazines."It's not about words," said Monte Cahn, founder and CEO of Moniker.com, a company that specializes in domain asset management and held the Manhattan auction. The auctions were held during a domain conference in June that attracts some of the biggest players in this niche business. The two sides eventually settled and Goldberger, a lawyer, was allowed to keep the name.

.2 million and a fifth for a client, representing only a handful of the names sold for a total of .4 million during both the live and silent auction. Goldberger's entry into the business was unorthodox to say the least. sued him, alleging trademark infringement after Goldberger registered esqwire.com, which resembles one of the company's magazines.

"It's not about words," said Monte Cahn, founder and CEO of Moniker.com, a company that specializes in domain asset management and held the Manhattan auction. The auctions were held during a domain conference in June that attracts some of the biggest players in this niche business. The two sides eventually settled and Goldberger, a lawyer, was allowed to keep the name.

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